2020 press releases from CIAC

CIAC member Pyrowave receives $3.3M from Innovation, Science and Industry Canada

The Chemistry Industry Association of Canada (CIAC) is pleased to see the Government of Canada providing CIAC member, Pyrowave, with more than $3 million in funding to support their continued development of clean technologies that help reduce plastic waste, while building healthier communities and transitioning into a modern, circular economy for plastics.

Quebec-based Pyrowave has a patented technology that breaks down plastics using high heat produced by microwaves. This technology is packaged in small, modular units that can be used directly onsite at recycling facilities and at producers of plastic waste.

“Pyrowave is the perfect example of how innovative companies can make a tangible impact in our mission to reduce and eliminate plastic waste,” said Bob Masterson, President and CEO, CIAC. “This technology shows how companies can make great strides in creating a circular economy for plastic waste that generates jobs, grows the Canadian economy, and benefits the environment.”

“Our investment in clean technology not only helps reduce Canada’s environmental impact but also supports innovative Canadian entrepreneurs in getting their clean technologies to global markets,” said the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry.

CIAC’s members are committed to developing a more sustainable approach for waste management through better designs, innovative recycling and working with all levels of government. The CIAC and its members have ambitious targets that underscore our commitment to a future without plastic waste. These targets include 100 per cent of plastics packaging being reused, recycled, or recovered by 2040 and 100 per cent of plastics packaging being recyclable or recoverable by 2030.

For full details on the CIAC’s commitment to reducing plastic waste, visit GettingPlasticsRight.ca.

Canada’s chemistry sector commits to enhancing engagement with Indigenous communities

The Chemistry Industry Association of Canada (CIAC) has updated its United Nations-recognized Responsible Care® Codes for 2020 to include new commitments for Canada’s leading chemical companies to engage Indigenous communities through proactive and formal processes.

While developing the codes, the CIAC engaged with Indigenous communities and their leaders, and these new commitments for CIAC members will taking effect this month.

CIAC members’ efforts to meet these important commitments will be assessed during their obligatory Responsible Care verification process, which is undertaken regularly by third parties with results made available to the public on CIAC’s website.

“Since the beginning of Responsible Care in 1985, CIAC members have been obligated to be accountable and responsive to the public, especially local communities who have the right to understand the risks and benefits of what they do,” said Bob Masterson, CIAC President and CEO. “In extending that obligation to specifically include Indigenous communities, Canada’s chemistry sector demonstrates the ongoing relevance of Responsible Care and its ability to be responsive to evolving societal expectations for the industry.”

Responsible Care commitments require CIAC member companies to:

  • Engage with Indigenous People in a manner that respects their unique history, culture and rights;
  • Provide appropriate supports to ensure Indigenous communities have the capacity to engage the company in a meaningful manner; and
  • Provide Indigenous communities with equitable access to employment, contracting and business opportunities.

For more than 30 years, Canada’s chemistry sector has led the journey towards safe, responsible and sustainable chemical manufacturing through its U.N.-recognized sustainability initiative, Responsible Care. Founded in Canada in 1985, Responsible Care is now practised in 73 countries and by 96 of the 100 largest chemical producers in the world. All CIAC members commit to and are publicly verified to the Responsible Care Ethics and Principles for Sustainability and the Responsible Care Codes, which cover all aspects of the company’s business and product lifecycle.

For more information on Responsible Care, visit our website

 

Backgrounder

Responsible Care® Indigenous Communities Code Elements

Responsible Care is the flagship program of the chemistry industry that ensures CIAC members innovate for safer and greener products and processes, and work to continuously improve their environmental, health and safety performance.  Launched in Canada in 1985 (and now adopted in 73 countries and recognized by the United Nations) CIAC member-companies strive to “do the right thing and be seen to do the right thing.”  This is our commitment to sustainability – delivering results for the betterment of society, the environment, and the economy.

Responsible Care® Ethics and Principles

The Ethics and Principles for Sustainability are the bedrock of Responsible Care. Commitment to these ethics and principles is a condition of CIAC membership and extends through to our transportation and service company partners.

Responsible Care is driven by the following core ethics and principles:

  • Work for the improvement of people’s lives and the environment, while striving to do no harm;
  • Be accountable and responsive to the public, especially our local communities, who have the right to understand the risks and benefits of what we do;
  • Take preventative action to protect health and the environment;
  • Innovate for safer products and processes that conserve resources and provide enhanced value;
  • Engage with our business partners to ensure the stewardship and security of our products, services and raw materials throughout their lifecycles;
  • Understand and meet expectations for social responsibility;
  • Work with all stakeholders for public policy and standards that enhance sustainability, act to advance legal requirements and meet or exceed their letter and spirit;
  • Promote awareness of Responsible Care and inspire others to commit to these principles.

Responsible Care® Codes

The Responsible Care Codes influence the decisions our member-companies make every day.  The most senior executive of each CIAC member-company must renew his or her corporate commitment to these principles annually, and this corporate commitment is put into practice through the implementation of a robust management system that drives continuous improvement towards meeting the Responsible Care codes.

Responsible Care is guided by 152 codes of practice covering Operations, Stewardship and Accountability, as described below:

  • Operations Codes: outline how Responsible Care companies should manage their facilities and equipment to ensure that they’re operated in a safe and responsible way. Companies must work to continuously improve the environmental performance of their facilities and processes and reduce their resource consumption.
  • Stewardship Codes: outline how companies must regularly review the value, impact and safety of the products that they make, and the services and technologies that they use. They must also work with their business partners – suppliers, distributors, transporters and customers – to ensure the stewardship and security of their products over their entire life cycle
  • Accountability Codes: outline how companies communicate the risks and benefits of their operations to those who live beside their plants, or in communities along transportation corridors, as well as to other stakeholders, and to work to address any concerns that they may have.

As of January 2020, new codes have been added to the Responsible Care program to formally address Indigenous community engagement within the program.  The new codes supplement the existing Responsible Care’s Accountability Code requirements to encourage proactive engagement, effective and timely communications and dialogue respecting unique history, culture and rights and seek equitable access for employment and contracting opportunities.  The new codes are detailed below:

Indigenous Communities Codes

This section refers to Indigenous Communities that are located in the area near a company-owned or leased production facility.

Engagement with such Indigenous Communities shall be undertaken with respect for their unique history, culture and rights.

The company is expected to identify those aspects of the Indigenous code elements that are appropriate for the size, scope and risk profile of the company, including nature, scale and impacts of its operations, activities, products and services.

These Indigenous code elements are intended to supplement the requirements of the other sections of the Accountability Code.  

The company shall implement and maintain an ongoing process that:

AC 153

Identifies and seeks to pro-actively engage with such Indigenous Communities

AC 154

Seeks to develop and maintain a working relationship with such Indigenous Communities to enable effective communications, dialogue or response to questions, suggestions or concerns expressed so they are addressed in a timely and respectful manner;

AC 155

Provides support, as appropriate, to allow such Indigenous Communities the capacity to engage meaningfully with the Company;

AC 156

Periodically reviews the effectiveness of the outreach, communications and engagement process with such Indigenous Communities;

ACC 157

Provides Indigenous Community members equitable access to employment and contracting opportunities, including procurement and supply chain.

 

Executives from U.S., Canadian, and Mexican chemical industries reaffirm support for new North American Free Trade Agreement

Ottawa, Canada, January 16, 2020 — Leading executives representing the U.S., Canadian and Mexican chemical industries today publicly reaffirmed their support for U.S. ratification of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), also known as the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) in Canada and the Tratado entre México, Estados Unidos y Canadá (T-MEC) in Mexico.

The announcement, led by American Chemistry Council (ACC) President and CEO, Chris Jahn; Chemistry Industry Association of Canada (CIAC) President and CEO, Bob Masterson; and Asociación Nacional de la Industria Química (ANIQ) President, Miguel Benedetto Alexanderson, comes just hours before an expected U.S. Senate vote on USMCA that would bring the agreement one step closer to ratification. The announcement continues years of collaboration among the three associations on North American trade issues, including a joint March 2017 statement on industry priorities for modernizing the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

“We all win under this new agreement,” said ACC’s Jahn. “Our unanimous support for ratifying USMCA is a testimony to the collaborative, highly integrated North American chemical manufacturing sector that is uniquely positioned to continue to grow and create new jobs under the new North American trade pact. For the United States in particular, companies eyeing the U.S. shale gas revolution and chemical production boom should soon have even greater confidence to invest, knowing that they will be able to trade freely with our industry’s largest trading partners in Canada and Mexico,” Jahn added.

“We’re thrilled at the prospect of Canada’s ratification of CUSMA to further minimize barriers to North American chemicals trade,” added CIAC’s Masterson. “Eliminating tariffs and other barriers to trade has changed the conditions of doing business across borders in North America and encouraged regional investment and economic integration. Producers have become more efficient and more productive because they can benefit from vertical specialization and economies of scale. Canadian, Mexican, and U.S. goods – including chemicals, and goods that require chemicals as inputs – are competitive in the global marketplace because they are products of integrated North American supply chains,” he said.

“T-MEC strengthens NAFTA’s legacy of eliminating tariffs – removing barriers to trade, keeping North American manufacturing costs low, and boosting Mexico’s chemicals exports and creating new jobs that depend on those exports,” said ANIQ’s Benedetto. “In particular, T-MEC will enable Mexico, Canada, and the United States to evaluate where they may be able to cooperate and regulate chemicals more efficiently. We see greater regulatory cooperation as an unqualified win for companies here in Mexico and consumers throughout the region who support a risk-based approach to regulating chemicals and protecting human health and safety and the environment,” he said.

 

Fast Facts about the North American Chemicals Industry and Trading Relationship:

U.S. Business of Chemistry (in US dollars):

  • The U.S. business of chemistry is a US$553 billion enterprise that provides 542,000 skilled, good-paying American jobs.
  • American chemistry supports over 25 percent of U.S. GDP; provides 14 percent of the world’s chemicals; and accounts for 10 percent of all U.S. goods exports.
  • In 2018, U.S. chemical manufacturers exported $46 billion, or one-third of all U.S. chemicals exports, to Canada and Mexico. Around 44 percent of U.S. chemicals exports to Canada and Mexico are to related parties.
  • Nearly a quarter of all U.S. chemical imports are from Canada and Mexico. 64 percent of those imports are from related parties.
  • Trade with Canada and Mexico supports 46,000 U.S. chemical industry jobs.

Business of Chemistry in Canada (in Canadian dollars):

  • The Canadian chemical industry is responsible for CA$58 billion in chemical shipments.
  • Canada traded $65.1 billion in chemical products with the U.S. and Mexico in 2018.
  • The Canadian chemistry industry employs approximately 87,900 workers.

Business of Chemistry in Mexico (in US dollars):

  • Mexico’s chemical industry produced 22,675 tons of chemicals in 2018 and is responsible for $20.4 billion in chemical shipments.
  • Mexico traded $27.7 billion in chemical products with the United States and Canada in 2018. Chemicals trade between Mexico and all of its trading partners was $43.3 billion.
  • The Mexican chemical industry employs approximately 48,148 workers.

CIAC receives funding from Transport Canada to support railway safety across Canada

Ottawa, Canada, January 7, 2020 — The Chemistry Industry Association of Canada (CIAC) is pleased to announce Transport Canada’s Railway Safety Improvement Program (RSIP) will provide $219,750 in financial support over three years to help CIAC improve railway safety and education in communities across Canada.

The CIAC and its Transportation Community Awareness and Emergency Response initiative (TRANSCAER®) partners, including the Railway Association of Canada, successfully applied for funding to support three key activities that are focused on improving railway safety and training for people and communities along transportation routes.

The three key activities include:

  1. Construction of a new TRANSCAER® Safety Train—a railway tank car that will be converted into a classroom on wheels for the purpose of training emergency responders. The original Safety Train was retired in 2018. The pioneering concept has since been adopted by other organizations across North America and around the world.
  2. Development of advanced training tools—including virtual reality educational tools—that will allow state-of-the-art training and education in even the most remote communities. These enhanced learning and virtual reality training tools will help reach underserved regions of the country, such as the North, where the transit of the TRANSCAER® Safety Train may be more challenging.
  3. Delivering a Canada-wide series of training sessions for our target audiences using these new tools.

“Canada’s chemistry sector relies on the country’s railways to ship roughly 80 per cent of its production, including dangerous goods,” said Bob Masterson, President and CEO, CIAC . “This funding allows the CIAC and our TRANSCAER® initiative to reach, train, and educate even more stakeholders and communities across the country making sure they are informed about the products being moved through their area by rail, and what measures are in place to ensure their safe transportation.”

The enhanced educational tools and outreach efforts will focus on a variety of audiences in communities across the country, including first responders, community leaders, the general public, and Indigenous communities.

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