Determining chemistry’s role in Canada’s low carbon future

“How can we reconcile our ambitions to grow Canada's chemistry sector at a time when the nation has made a commitment to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030?”

That is the key question Bob Masterson, President and CEO of the Chemistry Industry Association of Canada (CIAC) chose to answer in an upbeat presentation to the Alberta Industrial Heartland Stakeholder Conference in Edmonton on January 25. 

He emphasized that determining chemistry's vital role in Canada's low carbon energy future goes to the very heart of determining the future of the chemistry industry in Canada. 

Masterson noted that Canada's advantage includes the type of feedstock utilized – natural gas, for example, as opposed to other jurisdictions that make the same chemicals using coal as a feedstock – meaning that right from the beginning our chemistry industry is cleaner, more efficient and less carbon emitting.  In fact, Masterson pointed out recent recommendations for lowering GHG emissions of chemistry producers in Europe look a lot like what Canada already has in place. 

“What I want you to understand clearly and be able to communicate to others is that Canada is uniquely advantaged to respond to the growing global demand for innovative, low carbon products, while at the same time addressing the climate change challenge both in our own sector, as well as in others.”

Masterson concluded by noting that to grow and sustain Canada's low carbon chemistry sector, what is ultimately needed are more supportive policies that promote investment and growth in the sector. 

“When it comes to climate change, the world truly needs more, not less, good chemistry, and more not less, made-in-Canada chemistry.”