Deron Bilous, Minister of Alberta Economic Development and Trade, and Eric Denhoff, Deputy Minister of the Alberta Climate Change Office, speak to CIAC Board.

On May 31, CIAC held its board meeting in Edmonton, Alberta focused on board appointments, new members, budget and finances, as well as updates on existing and emerging issues of importance to our members.

A luncheon and a dinner were held with invited Alberta government officials. At lunch,

Eric Denhoff, Deputy Minister of the Alberta Climate Change Office, was the guest speaker, and at dinner, Deron Bilous, Minister of Alberta Economic Development and Trade, gave remarks.

Denhoff focused his remarks on Alberta’s approach to reducing carbon emissions from large industrial sources through product based benchmarking and the use of Output-Based Allocations to mitigate the risk of carbon leakage for trade exposed sectors such as chemistry.

When it comes to climate change policies, Denholf explained, there is a need to use a balance approach that rewards those that are the most efficient but recognizes that annual improvements in perpetuity may not be feasible.

“We want you to improve your emissions, but we want you to be here to improve those emissions,” he said. He also recognized how important it is for industry to have a predictable future policy environment, and encouraged CIAC members to actively participate in the consultations taking place and to provide data to government.

During dinner, Bilous noted that the chemistry sector is “one of the key drivers of economic diversification in this province” and will continue to support

 

businesses with a desire to work in Alberta and existing businesses already here looking to expand.

“We understand that you are the economic engine of our province and it is our job to support you to ensure Alberta remains competitive and the best place to invest in the country,” he added.

CIAC will continue to engage with Alberta officials in other key ministries with the message that the chemistry industry needs all levels of government (federal, provincial, and municipal) to work together to attract new investment in the province.